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Silverado Canyon

Images of America

by Susan Deering

eBook

Hidden in the Santa Ana Mountains below Santiago Peak is a canyon called Silverado. The Spaniards called it Canon de la Madera because of the abundance of timber. The first non-native homesteaders arrived in 1876 to tend bees and grow fruit trees. With the discovery in 1877 of quartz deposits embedded with silver, the canyon became a hotbed of activity, with possibilities of newfound fortune for the hundreds of men who arrived there. Renamed Silverado City, the heart of the canyon turned into a bustling mining town. After the silver bust, peace and quiet returned and Silverado was promoted as a health resort, a place to "take the waters" that flowed from the natural sulfur springs. Attracted by the beauty of the canyon, city dwellers began visiting. Abandoned cabins were turned into small bungalows and used as vacation homes and eventually year-round residences. Through boom and bust, fire and flood, the canyon remains a unique and enchanting part of Orange County.


Expand title description text
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

Kindle Book

  • Release date: December 15, 2008

OverDrive Read

  • ISBN: 9781439636534
  • File size: 58875 KB
  • Release date: December 15, 2008

EPUB eBook

  • ISBN: 9781439636534
  • File size: 58875 KB
  • Release date: November 5, 2013

Formats

Kindle Book
OverDrive Read
EPUB eBook

subjects

History Nonfiction

Languages

English

Hidden in the Santa Ana Mountains below Santiago Peak is a canyon called Silverado. The Spaniards called it Canon de la Madera because of the abundance of timber. The first non-native homesteaders arrived in 1876 to tend bees and grow fruit trees. With the discovery in 1877 of quartz deposits embedded with silver, the canyon became a hotbed of activity, with possibilities of newfound fortune for the hundreds of men who arrived there. Renamed Silverado City, the heart of the canyon turned into a bustling mining town. After the silver bust, peace and quiet returned and Silverado was promoted as a health resort, a place to "take the waters" that flowed from the natural sulfur springs. Attracted by the beauty of the canyon, city dwellers began visiting. Abandoned cabins were turned into small bungalows and used as vacation homes and eventually year-round residences. Through boom and bust, fire and flood, the canyon remains a unique and enchanting part of Orange County.


Expand title description text