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Beach Mexican

Assimilation and Identity in Redondo Beach

American Heritage

by Alex Moreno Areyan

eBook

1 of 1 copy available

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Alex Moreno Areyan’s odyssey of growing up Latino in white upper-middle-class Redondo Beach in the 1950s presents a story of assimilation different from that experienced by Mexican Americans in larger barrios. His annual “white lie” to classmates was that his father got a job up north and the family was moving. They moved, all right—in a 1941 Plymouth with the harvest. In Marysville, Meridian and Mendota, they lived in tents and cars, under trucks and in corrugated tin hovels while picking cotton, tomatoes, peaches, walnuts and plums. The kid once threatened with permanent expulsion from Redondo Union High for speaking Spanish on campus eventually received a plaque from the City of Redondo Beach for writing the Mexican American history of the city. Beach Mexican proves the journey wasn’t easy.


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Publisher: Arcadia Publishing Inc.

Kindle Book

  • Release date: July 23, 2013

OverDrive Read

  • ISBN: 9781614239840
  • Release date: July 23, 2013

EPUB eBook

  • ISBN: 9781614239840
  • File size: 2871 KB
  • Release date: July 23, 2013

1 of 1 copy available

Formats

Kindle Book
OverDrive Read
EPUB eBook

subjects

History Nonfiction

Languages

English

Alex Moreno Areyan’s odyssey of growing up Latino in white upper-middle-class Redondo Beach in the 1950s presents a story of assimilation different from that experienced by Mexican Americans in larger barrios. His annual “white lie” to classmates was that his father got a job up north and the family was moving. They moved, all right—in a 1941 Plymouth with the harvest. In Marysville, Meridian and Mendota, they lived in tents and cars, under trucks and in corrugated tin hovels while picking cotton, tomatoes, peaches, walnuts and plums. The kid once threatened with permanent expulsion from Redondo Union High for speaking Spanish on campus eventually received a plaque from the City of Redondo Beach for writing the Mexican American history of the city. Beach Mexican proves the journey wasn’t easy.


Expand title description text